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Author Subject: Glossary
Welly Forum Admin

Location: Brizzle

Registered: 11 Jan 2004

Posts: 21,797

Status: Offline

Post #1
Cams Camshafts: Determines how the what, when and how much of anything goes in and out of the engine. We have 2 1 inlet & 1 outlet. Controlling when and what can give higher perfomance gains

Cat Catalytic converter: A government thing, they wanna drop emmisions, In reality they restrict air flow out of the engine causing a higher then normal back pressure

Compression A number to show what the compression rating is inside the engine
8-1 would be the amount of air in the chamber compressed 8 times. Low commpression is needed for turbo and supercharger applications due to air being forced in.

Ecu Electronic Control Unit: The brain off the engine, controls timing, fueling and all things engine related

Head Cylinder head: This is on top of the engine. The head seals the area above the pistons so that compression is created when the pistons travel up. The head is also where the air/fuel Mix enters the engine and the exhaust gas exits. To do this the Intake and exhaust valves open and close at precise times dictated by the Camshaft

Guides The seal between the valves and the head.

Lambda Sensor -The exhaust gas oxygen sensor (EGO or O2), or lambda sensor, is the key sensor in the engine fuel control feedback loop. The computer uses the O2 sensor's input to balance the fuel mixture, leaning the mixture when the sensor reads rich and richening the mixture when the sensor reads lean

MAP Sensor - manifold absolute pressure sensor, a variable resistor used to monitor the difference in pressure between the intake manifold at outside atmosphere. This information is used by the engine computer to monitor engine load (vacuum drops when the engine is under load or at wide open throttle). When the engine is under load, the ECU may alter spark timing and the fuel mixture to improve performance and emissions.

Piston This is in the main block of the engine, It moves up and down compressing the air/fuel mix. By modify these you can create more less compression or more as the case may be.

Nitrous Basic terms, Nitrous Oxide or N2O is a Gas that contains more oxygen than air and is cooler and more dense, By injecting this into the engine with more fuel under control it gives HUGE performance gains

Stepper Motor - (or Idle Control Valve) An electrically-operated valve which allows air to bypass the throttle plate in a fuel injected engine to regulate engine idle speed.

Supercharger Works off engine, when the engine turns the charger turns and "sucks" and compresses air into the intake. Like a turbo a lot more is needed than just bolting a charger on. Although this method gives instant power.

Turbo Works by exhaust gasses spinning a turbine that "SUCKS" more air into the engine, Alot more is needed than just Bolting on a turbo. You will need to lower compression, Install an intercooler and adjust management.

Valves These are located in the head, we have 16. 8 Inlet, 8 Exhaust.
They allow air and exhaust gasses to enter and exit the head by opening and closing. They bend if they hit the pistons and cause tapping

________________________________________

Life is a lie. The only certainty of which is death. Go live and enjoy yourself. The clock is ticking

Vrs power!!
Posted 17th Mar 2006 at 00:36
Welly Forum Admin

Location: Brizzle

Registered: 11 Jan 2004

Posts: 21,797

Status: Offline

Post #2
Pm me to add more, i can whip something up
even if you dont know i can sort it
Thumbs up

________________________________________

Life is a lie. The only certainty of which is death. Go live and enjoy yourself. The clock is ticking

Vrs power!!
Posted 6th Feb 2005 at 16:17

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Adrian Flux
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